Light Touch Paper Stand Clear

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Light Touch Paper Stand Clear file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Light Touch Paper Stand Clear book. Happy reading Light Touch Paper Stand Clear Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Light Touch Paper Stand Clear at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Light Touch Paper Stand Clear Pocket Guide.

I loved this alternate look at the start of the Trojan War, which takes Helen firmly out of the role of faithless seductress and makes both her and Paris pawns on several playing boards.

Light Touch Paper – Stand Clear

The structure with the different narrators and points of view was well-done and quite interesting. I loved the fact that it starts out reading as straight up fantasy, with some hints as to something not exactly adding up, but the eventual twist and reveal is awesome. I really liked this one. In addition to its steampunk vibe there are some definite overtones of horror to the tale. I like the conceit of the tale that everything in Hell is formed out of bodily components, such as rivers of blood, mucus rain drops, and trees made of fleshy limbs.

It also makes the story rather icky, though, and if you have a vivid imagination, you might want to steer clear.

Account Options

After being out of contact for two centuries due to civil war Earth is trying to re-corral all their colony planets. In the story we follow one of their forward scouts cum ambassadors on his mission on a rather curiously run planet. Still, it made me rethink the entire story and made me doubt everything about the setting. The Subjunctive Case was easily my favourite of the bunch. The story is a noirish paranormal detective in which our protagonist can split himself in two and have different aspects of himself conduct investigations simultaneously.

The actual case is interesting too, as it combines good, old-fashioned sleuthing and legwork with paranormal aspects in an environment — the story is set in Melbourne — not usually the backdrop for urban fantasy. I really enjoyed this story and I hope to see more from Rob Porteous in this setting in the future. Ripley Patton — Mary Had a Unicorn Another very cool premise in this story about a drug-abusing teen who is given a drug-sniffing and destroying unicorn as a companion to get her back on the straight and narrow. I really enjoyed the story and the writing. I really liked the story within a story and the way the build up to the apocalypse was done.

New Zealand male short story writers

Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Simon Petrie Goodreads Author Editor. Dave Luckett Contributor. Ian McHugh Contributor. Rob Porteous Contributor. Anna Tambour Contributor. Ripley Patton Goodreads Author Contributor.

Primary Menu

Matchless prose to fire your imagination! Get A Copy. More Details Ditmar Award Nominee for Best Collection Other Editions 1. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Sep 29, Mieneke rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , , science-fiction , horror. When I was approached about reviewing Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear, I'd just reviewed and loved Joanne Anderton's first two novels, so her name was the one that convinced me to accept the review request, together with that of Brenda Cooper, whose writing I've encountered previously in several Valdemar anthologies and which I've always enjoyed.

It turns out however, that this anthology holds far more attractions than just those two stories. As the anthology isn't based around a hard and fast When I was approached about reviewing Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear, I'd just reviewed and loved Joanne Anderton's first two novels, so her name was the one that convinced me to accept the review request, together with that of Brenda Cooper, whose writing I've encountered previously in several Valdemar anthologies and which I've always enjoyed. As the anthology isn't based around a hard and fast concept — from the introduction it becomes clear that the editors strived to evoke the same sense of surprise and wonder you get from watching fireworks — I thought I'd try something different this time and look at each story individually.

Dealing with a murder mystery, this story explores the cost of war to those who have to perform unspeakable acts in its fighting, the way it leaves them damaged and hurting. It's also a story of quiet love, constant in the face of societal disapproval.

Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear edited by Edwina Harvey and Simon Petrie – The Ranting Dragon

I really enjoyed the narrator's voice for this story, he's interesting and seems a man given to deep emotion and devotion, both to his craft and to those he loves. I loved this alternate look at the start of the Trojan War, which takes Helen firmly out of the role of faithless seductress and makes both her and Paris pawns on several playing boards. The structure with the different narrators and points of view was well-done and quite interesting.

It's also very funny and irreverent, a playful look at one of the world's original epics. That's actually a rather flippant and not quite accurate description, as this story goes a little beyond that and it rather straddles the line between fantasy and SF. I loved the fact that it starts out reading as straight up fantasy, with some hints as to something not exactly adding up, but the eventual twist and reveal is awesome.

I really liked this one. In addition to its steampunk vibe there are some definite overtones of horror to the tale. I like the conceit of the tale that everything in Hell is formed out of bodily components, such as rivers of blood, mucus rain drops, and trees made of fleshy limbs. It also makes the story rather icky, though, and if you have a vivid imagination, you might want to steer clear. After being out of contact for two centuries due to civil war Earth is trying to re-corral all their colony planets. In the story we follow one of their forward scouts cum ambassadors on his mission on a rather curiously run planet.

I really loved the twist ending, even if I'd partially seen it coming. Still, it made me rethink the entire story and made me doubt everything about the setting. I liked this one, especially its rather melancholy and sad ending, because for all its sadness, the reader is left with hope for Faet's future. Anna Tambour - Murder at the Tip The story starts with a fun excerpt from a journal article, which also touches on the story's main theme, which asks the question where and when we draw the line at giving artificial beings rights.

The protagonist's frustration with his hardware will be quite recognisable for anyone who's ever fought with their computers. Still, while well-written, the story didn't completely click for me and was one of my least favourites. The Subjunctive Case was easily my favourite of the bunch. The story is a noirish paranormal detective in which our protagonist can split himself in two and have different aspects of himself conduct investigations simultaneously.

I really liked the voice of this story; it's strong and confident.


  • Connect with Nature (Hypnosis & Meditation).
  • Goose the Bear;
  • Acadian Rendezvous!
  • The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable in Financial Risk Management: Measurement and Theory Advancing Practice.
  • Heroes and Butterflies.
  • Ces années-là (French Edition).

The actual case is interesting too, as it combines good, old-fashioned sleuthing and legwork with paranormal aspects in an environment — the story is set in Melbourne — not usually the backdrop for urban fantasy. I also liked the eventual resolution of the story, as it might not be what you'd expect. I really enjoyed this story and I hope to see more from Rob Porteous in this setting in the future.

Ripley Patton - Mary Had a Unicorn Another very cool premise in this story about a drug-abusing teen who is given a drug-sniffing and destroying unicorn as a companion to get her back on the straight and narrow. I really liked the development of Mary, the protagonist, from someone who isn't very sympathetic at all, to someone from whom all hope hasn't been lost that she might turn into a decent human being after all. It's a story of change and redemption. I really enjoyed the story and the writing.

Brenda Cooper - Between Lines Cooper's story is excellent. I really liked the story within a story and the way the build up to the apocalypse was done. I loved the conspiracy theories galore and the mind trick played on the protagonist. Ian McHugh - The Godbreaker and Unggubudh the Mountain A lovely secondary world story about loyalty, belief, religious diversity, and love. I really enjoyed it, though it took me a while to get into the writing style and the world. Sean McMullen - Hard Cases A political SF story set in an undated future, Hard Cases didn't really work for me, as the politics seemed muddled and there wasn't really a clear resolution.

Kathleen Jennings - Kindling While the protagonist's power is interesting and her desire to play a larger role in the world universal, I just couldn't achieve a click with her and couldn't get into the story as a result. In addition, Jennings uses an intertwining narrative structure, mixing a narrator telling Minke's story with scenes of Minke's day-to-day life, which worked rather confusing for me, as I couldn't relate the overarching narration with the scenes at the bar.

While the story premise was interesting, its execution just didn't work for me. With Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear , Harvey and Petrie achieve what they set out to do: compile an anthology that would make the reader sit up and pay attention, to delight and surprise them as much as a fireworks show might. This collection of stories is a delightful surprise, and even if there were two or three stories that didn't work as well for me, I had a really good time reading these stories and have discovered some new names to look out for in my reading.

This book was provided for review by the editor. May 25, S. Wright rated it really liked it. Paris I was on Mount Ida, taking care of my cows and also taking care of some herder girls, when the travellers arrived. Shooing away the nymph on my knee, I went to greet the gods—er, humble travellers.

Little Ung disappeared beneath the outcrop that sheltered the mouth of their cave. Little Ung hovered at his shoulder. Someone to call out a hero. Is there strength in diversity? This book was provided to me by the publisher Jun 04, Michelle rated it really liked it Shelves: , anthology , australian. An eclectic collection containing stories from a variety of Australian and international authors, Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear is an engaging body of work that contains a number of excellent stories, quite a few memorable ones, and should have something to suit almost anyone.

Sparks that fly in many directions. The anthology itself operates on the concept of a literal or figurative spark and the various possible results of its unleashed potential. This very open theme allows the authors a lot of leeway to let their imaginations run wild and results in a hugely varied collection. Some of the stories engage quite directly with the theme while others are a little more oblique in their connection. A little something for everyone. Much like lighting a real firework, you never know what you might get next with this anthology.

A blazing inferno, a quick flash and burn, a delicate showing of stars, or a disappointing fizzle? While there were a few stories I might not have picked if I was reading for an anthology of my own, they were all well written and I could see where their appeal might lie to other readers. Due to the huge variance in tone, style and theme between stories it is quite hard to pick a favourite. The one that resonated with me the most however, was probably the opening story by Joanne Anderton, titled The Bone Chime Song.

A haunting love story of guilt, redemption and necromancy, The Bone Chime Song will leave you thinking long after you finish reading it. All in all, it impressed me and I look forward to reading more of the authors work in the future. All in all, I thought it was well-written and impressive work from a relatively new author.

However, the writing was still good and the story was still creepy despite the somewhat heavy-handed treatment. I would consider all thirteen stories in Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear to be well worth reading, yet unfortunately lack the time required to give all the attention they deserve. In addition, some stories elude concise summary and may be spoiled in my attempts to explain them. Besides, I did say half the fun was trying to guess what was coming next.

Why should you read this book? Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear is an entertaining and enjoyable anthology containing stories of a consistently high quality with a couple of standouts. In my opinion, even just my few favourite stories were worth the cover price alone. All in all, I read some great new works by authors I knew, discovered some new authors to keep an eye on and will look out for any future anthologies by these editors and from this small press.

Aug 17, Ranting Dragon rated it really liked it Shelves: michelle. Sparks that fly in many directions The title, Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear, references the instructions given for lighting fireworks. This very open theme allows the authors a lot of leeway to let their imaginations run wild, resulting in a hugely varied collection.

A little something for everyone Much like lighting a real firework, you never know what you might get next with this anthology.

While there were a few stories I might not have picked if I was collecting for an anthology of my own, they were all well written and I could see where their appeal might lie for other readers. Favorite stories Due to the huge variance in tone, style, and theme between stories, it is quite hard to pick a favorite. Helen attempts to avoid the inevitable catastrophe, yet finds that vain goddesses rarely take no for an answer. All in all, I thought it was a well-written and impressive work from a relatively new author.

I would consider all thirteen stories in Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear to be well worth reading, yet unfortunately lack the time required to give them all the attention they deserve. In my opinion, even just my few favorite stories alone were worth the cover price. All in all, I read some great new works by authors I knew, discovered some new authors to keep an eye on, and will look out for any future anthologies by these editors and from this small press.

Apr 04, Tsana Dolichva rated it really liked it. Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear is quite a mixed bag as far as story content and style goes, not entirely surprising given that it's unthemed. When I was reading, it was impossible to guess what sort of story would come next. My favourite stories were the quirkier ones. I particularly liked "Mary Had a Unicorn" although I can't say I'd want to live in that world with drugs so prevalent.

On the other hand, "Hard Cases" gave me a bit more vicarious glee than is probably healthy. Two other stories I quite liked and which don't really fall in the quirky category were "Faet's Fire" by Thoraiya Dyer, which had beautiful writing, and "Kindling" by Kathleen Jennings, which was a pleasant wander through the lives of bar patrons. More thoughts on each story, recorded as soon as I finished reading it, below.

Overall, Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear is a diverse anthology which showcases a variety of stories and authors. I recommend it to fans of short fiction, perhaps looking for diverse reads in one single package. A complete world glimpsed through a short story. Interesting changes of perspective with each section. The protagonist is more than meets the eye. Enjoyed the reveal. Sort of. Didn't quite do it for me purely subjective reaction.

Travelling scout recruiting lost planets to the galactic empire. I expected a twist, but didn't quite pick it. Very well written and an enjoyable read, a little dark. Ironically, this was the story my Kobo chose to misbehave on. I didn't find it entirely believable and it reminded me a bit of Cold War SF. Not a bad story, though. Fight scenes a bit protracted for a short story.

I enjoyed it, perhaps thanks to a bit of vicarious activism. A barmaid with a knack for bringing people together. I quite liked it. You can read more of my reviews on my blog. Aug 02, Dave Versace rated it really liked it. This is a more or less unthemed anthology of mostly Australian speculative fiction short stories from Peggy Bright Books. First of all, while this is a collection of thirteen very interesting and well written stories - not one of them is a dud - it's a total mixed bag. There's no evident interconnection or sense that these stories form a greater whole.

If there's an editorial hand at work, it's largely invisible. It's just a group of spec fic from across the wide range that the term implies. The This is a more or less unthemed anthology of mostly Australian speculative fiction short stories from Peggy Bright Books. The pick of the bunch is probably Joanne Anderton's 'The Bone Chime Song', in which a necromancer calls in an old lover to help him solve a grisly massacre.


  • The Tin Ring: Love and Survival in the Holocaust;
  • Curious George The Dog Show (CGTV Reader);
  • TOUCHPAPER | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary;
  • Imagination @ Work.
  • Light Touch Paper Stand Clear!

I reviewed Jo Anderton's Debris in June and with this story I've added her to my list of writers to follow. It's gruesome, tense and aches with the sadness of lost romance. Of the rest there are time travellers, conspiracies, robots, aliens and matchmaking bar wenches. Something for everyone, I guess. Like I said, it's a collection of solid stories. I expect another reader might have a completely different subset of favourites, though I would be surprised at any top five that didn't include the Anderton. The implied world building in her story and McHugh's, as well is outstanding.

Both could clearly bear further exploration. Overall I would recommend the collection for anyone interested in a pleasant variety of appetising spec fic. May 14, Rick Keuning rated it it was amazing. Light Touch Paper, Stand Clear is a great book full of interesting and entertaining stories. The title interested me right off. I pictured the idea of the light of our eyes touching the written page and having a life changing impact on the reader.


source site admin